Reading WARC Records with Mathematica

Our notebook. Click through to find it.

Our notebook. Click through to find it.

Our project team uses a number of languages: Scala with warcbase, lots of shell commands when manipulating and analyzing textual data (especially social media, as Nick and I wrote about here), and Mathematica when we want to leverage the power and relative simplicity of that language.

William J. Turkel and I have been working a bit on getting WARC files to play with Mathematica. For larger numbers of files, warcbase is still the solution. But for a small collection – say a few WARCs created with webrecorder.io – this might be a lighter-weight approach. Indeed, I can see myself doing this if I went out around the web with WebRecorder, grabbed some sites (say public history sites or the like), and wanted to do some analysis on it.

Bill and I developed this together: he cooked up the record to association bit (which is really the core of this code), and I worked on getting us to be able to process entire WARCs and generate some basic analysis. It was also fun getting back into Mathematica, after living in Scala and Bash. Continue reading

From Dataverse to Gephi: Network Analysis on our Data, A Step-by-Step Walkthrough

Screen Shot 2015-12-10 at 4.20.20 PM

Do you want to make this link graph yourself from our data? Read on.

As part of our commitment to open data – in keeping with the spirit and principles of our funding agency, as well as our core scholarly principles – our research team is beginning to release derivative data. The first dataset that we are releasing is the Canadian Political Parties and Interest Groups link graph data, available in our Scholars Portal Dataverse space.

The first file is all-links-cpp-link.graphml, a file consisting of all of the links between websites found in the our collection. It was generated using warcbase’s function that extracts links and writes them to a graph network file, documented here. The exact script used can be found here.

However, releasing data is only useful if we show people how they can use it. So! Here you go.

Video Walkthrough

This video walkthrough is best viewed in conjunction with the step-by-step walkthrough below.

Step-by-Step Walkthrough

Once you’ve downloaded the file, open up Gephi.

On the opening screen, you want to select “Open a Graph File…” and select the all-links-cpp-link.graphml file that you downloaded from our Dataverse page. Continue reading