Herrenhausen Big Data Lightning Talk: Finding Community in the Ruins of GeoCities

I was fortunate to receive a travel grant to present my research in a short, three-minute slot plus poster at the Herrenhäuser Konferenz: Big Data in a Transdisciplinary Perspective in Hanover, Germany. Here’s what I’ll be saying (pretty strictly) in my slot this afternoon. Some of it is designed to respond to the time format (if you scroll down you will see that there is an actual bell). 

If you want to see the poster, please click here.

Milligan_LT_Big_Data

Big Data is coming to history. The advent of web archived material from 1996 onwards presents a challenge. In my work, I explore what tools, methods, and approaches historians need to adopt to study web archives.

GeoCities lets us test this. It will be one of the largest records of the lives of non-elite people ever. The Old Bailey Online can rightfully describe their 197,000 trials as the “largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published” between 1674 and 1913. But GeoCities, drawing on the material we have between 1996 and 2009, has over thirty-eight million pages.

These are the records of everyday people who published on the Web, reaching audiences far bigger than previously imaginable. Read more